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Ship canals and aquatic ecosystems

Science

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Abstract

Through a combination of ecosystem homeostasis and the perversity of man and nature, oftentimes the significant biological changes effected by environmental modifications are not detected until long after the initial change has taken place. The immediate impact, which may range from the spectacular to the undetectable, is a deceptive measure of the long-term and often more important changes in the ecosystem. Two major engineering achievements illustrate this premise: (i) construction of the Erie Canal, which provided access from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes, and the Welland Canal, which bypasses the block between Lakes Ontario and Erie created by Niagara Falls (Fig. 1), and (ii) construction of the Suez Canal between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Ship canals and aquatic ecosystems
Series title:
Science
Volume
174
Issue:
4004
Year Published:
1971
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Great Lakes Science Center
Description:
p. 13-20
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Science
First page:
13
Last page:
20
Number of Pages:
7