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The tullibee

Minnesota Conservation Volunteer

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Abstract

Early explorers and settlers of the northeastern United States and southern Canada found lakes teeming with fish that had white flesh and were good to eat. The larger of these they called whitefish, differentiating two kinds- the lake whitefish and the round or menominee whitefish. These looked much alike, and each had the same appearance wherever it was found. The smaller fishes with white flesh had a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors in different lakes and areas, and were given several names; most common of these were 'cisco,' 'lake herring,' and 'tullibee.' Cisco subsequently became the common name for all of the small whitefishes, and lake herring was the name given to a single shallow-water species. The use of the name 'tullibee' became less common after ichthyologists concluded that it was a form of lake herring.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
The tullibee
Series title:
Minnesota Conservation Volunteer
Volume
29
Issue:
170
Year Published:
1966
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Great Lakes Science Center
Description:
p. 49-50
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Minnesota Conservation Volunteer
First page:
49
Last page:
50
Number of Pages:
1