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Environmental contaminants and the reproductive success of lake trout in the Great Lakes: an epidemiological approach

Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health

By:
,
DOI: 10.1080/15287399109531536

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Abstract

Epidemiological criteria were used to examine the influence of environmental contamination on reproductive success of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Most of the information was obtained from lake trout eggs collected in southeastern Lake Michigan and reared in the laboratory. Two separate end points that measure reproductive success - egg hatchability and fry survival - were used in the evaluation. Strong evidence for maternally derived polychlorinated biphenyls causing reduced egg hatchability were observed for the time order, strength of association, and coherence criteria. Equally strong evidence for organic environmental contaminants, also of maternal origin, causing a swim-up fry mortality syndrome were presented for the strength of association, specificity, replication, and coherence criteria. The epidemiological approach for demonstrating cause-and-effect relations was useful because of the difficulty in demonstrating definite proof of causality between specific environmental contaminants and reproductive dysfunction in feral fish.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Environmental contaminants and the reproductive success of lake trout in the Great Lakes: an epidemiological approach
Series title:
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health
DOI:
10.1080/15287399109531536
Volume
33
Issue:
4
Year Published:
1991
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Contributing office(s):
Great Lakes Science Center
Description:
p. 375-394
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health
First page:
375
Last page:
394
Number of Pages:
19