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Recurrence, mortality, and dispersal of prairie striped skunks, Mephitis mephitis, and implications to rabies epizootiology

Canadian Field-Naturalist

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Abstract

Detailed study of radio-equipped individuals of the Striped Skunk (Mephitis mephitis) in a North Dakota population provided insight into possible mechanisms for spread of rabies during spring and summer. Annual recurrence rates of 138 skunks marked on a study area averaged 11% for adult males, 43% for adult females and 9% for kits. Population changes were from mortality (including rabies) and dispersal. Five instances of adult dispersal (four by males) were recorded; maximum straight-line distance was 119 km. Some males initiated dispersal in spring. Communal denning by adults occurred rarely after whelping began but resulted in intraspecific conflict. Evidence of intraspecific and interspecific strife leading to kit mortality and some adult mortality was found at dens of 9 of 40 litters studied.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Recurrence, mortality, and dispersal of prairie striped skunks, Mephitis mephitis, and implications to rabies epizootiology
Series title:
Canadian Field-Naturalist
Volume
96
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1982
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center
Description:
p. 312-316
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
312
Last page:
316
Number of Pages:
4