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Kleptoparasitism by bald eagles wintering in south-central Nebraska

Journal of Field Ornithology

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Abstract

Kleptoparasitism on other raptors was one means by which Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) secured food along the North Platte and Platte rivers during the winters of 1978-1980. Species kelptoparasitized were Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis), Red-tailed Hawk (B. jamaicensis), Rough-legged Hawk (B. lagopus), Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), and Bald Eagle. Stealing of prey occurred more often during the severe winter of 1978-1979 when ice cover restricted eagles from feeding on fish than during the milder winter of 1979-1980. Kleptoparasitism occurred principally in agricultural habitats where large numbers of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were foraging. Subadults watched adults steal food and participated in food-stealing with adults, which indicated interspecific kleptoparasitism may be a learned behavior. We suggest factors that may favor interspecific kleptoparasitism as a foraging strategy of Bald Eagles in obtaining waterfowl during severe winters.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Kleptoparasitism by bald eagles wintering in south-central Nebraska
Series title:
Journal of Field Ornithology
Volume
59
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1988
Language:
English
Description:
p. 183-188
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
183
Last page:
188
Number of Pages:
5