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Protection of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) against plague after voluntary consumption of baits containing recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine

Infection and Immunity

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Abstract

Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and significant reservoirs of plague for humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to 18 black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption; 18 negative control animals received placebo baits. Antibody titers against Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly (P < 0.01) in vaccinees, and their survival was significantly higher upon challenge with Y. pestis than that of negative controls (P < 0.01).

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Protection of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) against plague after voluntary consumption of baits containing recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine
Series title:
Infection and Immunity
Volume
72
Issue:
9
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
National Wildlife Health Center
Description:
p. 5502-5505
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Infection and Immunity
First page:
5502
Last page:
5505
Number of Pages:
4