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Type C botulism losses at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, 1978

Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters

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Abstract

Avian botulism was responsible for the death of over 6,000 waterfowl at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin in 1978. The outbreak occurred in early fall on a flooded 250 hectare fallow agricultural area on the northeast end of the refuge. The species most severely affected was the green-winged teal (Anas carolinensis), which made up almost 45% of the total birds found. Carcass pick-up, mouse toxicity tests, and antitoxin injections of waterfowl are discussed.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Type C botulism losses at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, 1978
Series title:
Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters
Volume
68
Year Published:
1980
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
National Wildlife Health Center
Description:
p. 208-211
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters
First page:
208
Last page:
211
Number of Pages:
4