thumbnail

Ecology and physiology of en route nearctic-neotropical migratory birds: a call for collaboration

The Condor

By:
and

Links

Abstract

Ornithologists who regularly witness the breathtaking influx of songbirds at stopover sites during spring or fall migration know that birds are tremendously adaptable. Migration encompasses a range of actions distinct from permanent residency but includes altitudinal movements, sporadic irruptions, short-distance flights, as well as obligate long-distance movements (Able 1991). Migration can be acquired, abandoned, or prolonged by a species depending on conditions along their migratory routes (Able and Beltoff 1998). Previously nonmigratory populations may undertake migration where changing conditions become increasingly disadvantageous for the resident population or where interspecific competition becomes more severe. Regardless of the distance or motivation, migration is physiologically demanding and potentially riskya?|

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Ecology and physiology of en route nearctic-neotropical migratory birds: a call for collaboration
Series title:
The Condor
Volume
107
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2005
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Fort Collins Science Center
Description:
p. 193-196
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
The Condor
First page:
193
Last page:
196