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Factors influencing the distribution and abundance of diaptomid copepods in high elevation lakes in the Pacific Northwest, USA

Hydrobiologia

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Abstract

We investigated the impact of abiotic factors and trout density on distribution and abundance of diaptomid copepods in high-elevation lakes in North Cascades National Park Service Complex (NOCA), Washington, USA. The most common large diaptomid, D. kenai (mean length = 1.88 mm), was able to persist over a wide range of abiotic factors, but the small herbivorous diaptomid, D. tyrrelli (mean length = 1.18 mm), was restricted to shallow lakes (maximum depth < a?? 10 m) with relatively high concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total phosphorous. There was a significant negative relationship between the density of D. tyrrelli and the density of large diaptomids ( D. kenai and D. arcticus), which could imply interaction between large and small diaptomids. The abundance of large diaptomids was significantly lower in shallow lakes with high densities of reproducing trout (> 250 fish ha-1) than in fishless lakes, in deep lakes with reproducing trout, or in lakes where trout do not reproduce and are 0periodically stocked with fry at low densities (average 179 fry a-1). In lakes where chemical conditions were suitable for D. tyrrelli, the small diaptomid was often abundant when trout density was high and large diaptomids were either absent or in low abundance. Our research suggests that trout density, nutrient concentration, and lake depth influence the abundance of diaptomid copepods in high lakes in NOCA.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Factors influencing the distribution and abundance of diaptomid copepods in high elevation lakes in the Pacific Northwest, USA
Series title:
Hydrobiologia
Volume
379
Issue:
1-3
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description:
p. 63-75
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Hydrobiologia
First page:
63
Last page:
75
Number of Pages:
13