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Amphibian and reptile abundance in riparian and upslope areas of five forest types in western Oregon

Northwest Science

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Abstract

We compared species composition and relative abundance of herpetofauna between riparian and upslope habitats among 5 forest types (shrub, open sapling-pole, large sawtimber and old-growth conifer forests, and deciduous forests) in Western Oregon. Riparian- and upslope- associated species were identified based on capture frequencies from pitfall trapping. Species richness was similar among forest types but slightly greater in the shrub stands. The abundances of 3 species differed among forest types. Total captures was highest in deciduous forests, intermediate in the mature conifer forests, and lowest in the 2 young coniferous forests. Species richness was similar between stream and upslope habitats; however, captures were higher in riparian than upslope habitat. Tailed frogs (Ascaphus truei), Dunn's salamanders (Plethodon dunni), roughskin newts(Tanicha granulosa), Pacific giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) and red-legged frogs(Rana aurora) were captured more frequently in riparian than upslope habitats. Of these species the red-legged frog and Pacific giant salamander may depend on riparian habitat for at least part of their life requirements, while tailed frogs, Dunn's salamanders and roughskin newts appear to be riparian associated species. In addition, we found Oregon salamanders (Ensatina eschscholtzi) were associated with upslope habitats. We suggest riparian management zones should be al least 75-100 m on each side of the stream and that management for upslope/and or old forest associates may be equally as important as for riparian species.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Amphibian and reptile abundance in riparian and upslope areas of five forest types in western Oregon
Series title:
Northwest Science
Volume
70
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1996
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description:
p. 109-119
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Northwest Science
First page:
109
Last page:
119
Number of Pages:
11