thumbnail

Effects of silvicultultural modifications of temperate rainforest on breeding and wintering bird communities, Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska

The Condor

By:
, , , , , and

Links

  • The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time
  • Download citation as: RIS

Abstract

We inventoried breeding and wintering bird communities in four treatments of temperate rainforest on Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska during 1991-1992 and 1992-1993. The four forest treatments sampled included: (1) young growth (20 years) originating from clearcut logging with no silvicultural modification (non-modified), (2) young growth (20 years) precommercially thinned along uniformly-spaced thinning grids (thinned), (3) young growth (20 years) with gaps in the overstory canopy created by felling trees in 0.05-ha openings (gapped), and (4) virgin old growth (2 150 years). Of 16 common breeding bird species observed, six showed significant responses to young-growth modifications. One species was more abundant and two species were less abundant in thinned sites, while one species was more abundant and two species were less abundant in gapped sites than at least one of the other treatments. None of the three common wintering species of birds observed was influenced by young-growth modification. Breeding bird communities, in general, were less similar between young- and old-growth treatments than among young-growth treatments. Three of the 16 common breeding bird species were more abundant in old growth than each of the young-growth treatments and one uncommon species was detected almost exclusivelyi n old growth duringb oth the breedinga nd wintering seasonsF. our other breeding bird species were more abundant in young-growth treatments than in old growth. Higher use of old growth by wintering birds was related to winter severity. To enhance habitat for wintering and breeding birds we recommend: (1) thinning young growth along variablespaced grids to create additional canopy layers and improve snow-intercept properties of young growth for canopy-foraging birds, (2) retention of old-growth clumps in clearcuts for bird species associated with old-growth structure, and (3) long-term conservation of oldgrowth temperate rainforest for breeding and wintering birds positively associated with old growth.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Effects of silvicultultural modifications of temperate rainforest on breeding and wintering bird communities, Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska
Series title:
The Condor
Volume
98
Issue:
4
Year Published:
1996
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description:
p. 706-721
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
The Condor
First page:
706
Last page:
721