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Distribution and status of marine birds breeding along the coasts of the Chukchi and Bering seas

Research Report 11

By:
and

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Abstract

The Alaska coast fronting on the Chukchi and Bering seas, exclusive of the Aleutian Islands, supports seven complexes of marine bird colonies numbering more than 1 million birds each, nine colonies of 100,000 to almost 1 million birds, and many smaller colonies. Colonies are found on most headlands and islands and are dominated numerically by alcids and kittiwakes (Rissa sp.). Estuarine habitats (mainly the lowlands of northern Seward Peninsula, Yukon-Kuskokwim delta, and the north side of the Alaska Peninsula) are extremely important for breeding and migrating marine waterfowl, shorebirds, gulls (Larus sp.), and terns (Sterna sp.). Information on population size and distribution of breeding marine birds within this area is extensive for only a few of the more heavily hunted species of waterfowl. Except for the intensive and systematic censusing of a few colonies in this region, population data on cliff-, burrow-, and crevice-nesting birds are such that all but gross changes in numbers may go unnoticed, and if noticed they could not be measured.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Title:
Distribution and status of marine birds breeding along the coasts of the Chukchi and Bering seas
Series title:
Research Report
Series number:
11
Year Published:
1979
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Publisher location:
Washington, DC
Contributing office(s):
Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center
Description:
p. 21-31 [319 pp.]
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Larger Work Title:
Conservation of marine birds of northern North America
First page:
21
Last page:
31
Number of Pages:
11