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Woodcock response to habitat management in Maine

Research Report 14

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Abstract

A study was initiated in 1975 at the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge to develop habitat management techniques for woodcock (Philohela minor) that could be used by small landowners as well as in commercial forestry operations. Use of selected diurnal covers by adult female and juvenile woodcock increased after strips were clearcut through these covers. Woodcock use of clearcut strips for feeding was equivalent to that in adjacent uncut areas after only 6 years of growth. Small clearings created by firewood cutters in a 1,200-ha hardwood stand increased singing male activity, but commercial forest operations were necessary to increase singing-male use in relation to the rest of the refuge. The age structure of courting males on new clearings favored second-year males (65%), but older males (55 %) were more common on established singing grounds. Spring burning of commercial-quality blueberry fields increased roosting activity during the summer of the burn. Roosting woodcock also preferred clearcuts adjacent to active summer fields in which the slash had not been treated. Management recommendations are also given.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Title:
Woodcock response to habitat management in Maine
Series title:
Research Report
Series number:
14
Year Published:
1982
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
v, 191
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
Federal Government Series
First page:
106
Last page:
113