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Avian reproductive physiology

OCLC 29219655
By:
Edited by:
Edward F. Gibbons = Jr., Barbara S. Durrant, Jack Demarest

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Abstract

Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos and gametes, embryo transplant, DNA analysis and manipulation, disease screening and control, and improved release conditioning methods.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Book chapter
Publication Subtype:
Book Chapter
Title:
Avian reproductive physiology
Year Published:
1995
Language:
English
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publisher location:
Albany, NY
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
xiv, 810
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Other Government Series
Larger Work Title:
Conservation of Endangered Species in Captivity: An Interdisciplinary Approach
First page:
241
Last page:
262