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Comparison of birds detected from roadside and off-road point counts in the Shenandoah National Park

PDF on file: 4772_Keller.pdf
By:
,
Edited by:
C. John Ralph, John R. Sauer, Sam Droege

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Abstract

Roadside point counts are generally used for large surveys to increase the number of samples. We examined differences in species detected from roadside versus off-road (200-m and 400-ha) point counts in the Shenandoah National Park. We also compared the list of species detected in the first 3 minutes to those detected in 10 minutes for potential species biases. Results from 81 paired roadside and off-road counts indicated that roadside counts had higher numbers of several edge species but did not have lower numbers of nonedge forest species. More individuals and species were detected from roadside points because of this increase in edge species. Sixty-five percent of the species detected in 10 minutes were recorded in the first 3 minutes.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Book chapter
Publication Subtype:
Book Chapter
Title:
Comparison of birds detected from roadside and off-road point counts in the Shenandoah National Park
Year Published:
1995
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest Experiment Station.
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
iv, 181
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Other Government Series
First page:
111
Last page:
115