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Combining information from monitoring programs: Complications associated with indices and geographic scale

1995 Partners in Flight International Workshop, Cape May, N.J.
By:
Edited by:
Rick Bonney, David N. Pashley, Robert Cooper, Larry Niles

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Abstract

To adequately monitor Neotropical migratory birds, information must be collected to assess population change at local, regional, and continent-wide scales. I suggest that large-scale survey results (such as those derived from the North American Breeding Bird Survey) should not be used to predict population attributes on parks, refuges, and other protected areas. These areas are often managed, and generally contain habitats that can be poorly sampled in large scale surveys, hence local bird populations might be quite different from those sampled in the large-scale surveys. Furthermore, we are limited in our capabilities to combine information from local surveys with large-scale survey data. Most surveys of bird populations collect indices of abundance which are often not comparable among surveys due to habitat and region specific differences in probabilities of detecting birds. In assessing the effects of management, it is important to understand the limitations of monitoring at different geographic scales and to design programs to monitor at the scale at which management is conducted.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Book chapter
Publication Subtype:
Book Chapter
Title:
Combining information from monitoring programs: Complications associated with indices and geographic scale
Year Published:
2000
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station
Publisher location:
Ogden, Utah
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
281
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Other Government Series
First page:
124
Last page:
126
Number of Pages:
281