thumbnail

A comparison of behavior for two cohorts of captive-reared greater sandhill cranes released in northern Arizona

By:
, , and

Links

  • The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time
  • Download citation as: RIS

Abstract

To determine how the behavior of greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) changes according to time of year, time of day, and number of days after release, we observed the activities of 2 groups of captive-reared greater sandhill cranes at Mormon Lake, northern Arizona. The behaviors we compared were alert, loafing, sleeping, foraging, preening, locomotion, and other. We found costume-reared subadult greater sandhill cranes that were established at the study site for a year spent more time foraging and being alert towards predators than parent-reared juvenile greater sandhill cranes that were recently released from captivity. We also found that with time juvenile sandhill cranes were increasingly alert and spent less time loafing. It appeared that captive-reared juvenile sandhill cranes learn behavior important for survival from previously released captive-reared cranes.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Book chapter
Publication Subtype:
Book Chapter
Title:
A comparison of behavior for two cohorts of captive-reared greater sandhill cranes released in northern Arizona
Year Published:
2001
Language:
English
Publisher:
North American Crane Working Group
Publisher location:
Seattle, Washington
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
ix, 226
Larger Work Type:
Book
Larger Work Subtype:
Other Government Series
Larger Work Title:
Proceedings of the Eighth North American Crane Workshop
First page:
145
Last page:
154