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Fall migration of woodcock at Cape May, New Jersey

Journal of Wildlife Management

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Abstract

From 1968 to 1973, 2,337 American woodcock (Philohela minor) were banded during late fall on the Cape May Peninsula of southern New Jersey. Direct recovery rates averaged 3.6 percent for hatching-year birds and 1.7 percent for adults. Distribution of recoveries indicated that Cape May migrants wintered on the coastal plain of Virginia and North Carolina. Indirect recoveries showed that Peninsula woodcock originated from as far north as New England and eastern Canada. The percentage of woodcock seen which were caught by night-lighting averaged 2.5 times greater from a truck than on foot. Age-sex structure of ban dings was similar each year with the overall composition as follows: immaturemales, 57 percent; immature females, 28 percent; adult males, 10 percent; and adult females, 5 percent. Compared to the continental population, there was an unusually high proportion of immature woodcock at Cape May during late fall.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Fall migration of woodcock at Cape May, New Jersey
Series title:
Journal of Wildlife Management
Volume
41
Issue:
1
Year Published:
1977
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
104-111
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Wildlife Management
First page:
104
Last page:
111
Number of Pages:
8