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Howling at two Minnesota wolf pack summer homesites

Canadian Journal of Zoology

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Abstract

Howling sessions were monitored at two Minnesota wolf pack homesites for 2255 h between 29 April and 3 August 1973. All sessions recorded occurred from dusk through early morning, with an evening peak for one pack. Within a night, multiple sessions were grouped temporally, most occurring within an hour of one another. Howling rates for both packs increased throughout the homesite season, with the larger pack howling twice as frequently. The role of howling in both intrapack and interpack contexts was considered. Much of the howling seemed to be involved in the coordination of pack activities. Further, the low frequency and clumped temporal distribution of sessions suggest that howling plays a secondary role in interpack contexts to other modes such as scent marking during the homesite season, but may increase in relative importance once homesites are abandoned and pack travel becomes nomadic.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Howling at two Minnesota wolf pack summer homesites
Series title:
Canadian Journal of Zoology
Volume
56
Issue:
9
Year Published:
1978
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
2024-2028
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Canadian Journal of Zoology
First page:
2024
Last page:
2028
Number of Pages:
5