thumbnail

Fall and winter homesite use by wolves in northeastern Minnesota

Canadian Field-Naturalist

By:
,

Links

  • The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time

Abstract

Post-abandonment homesite use by wolves (Canis lupus) was studied by radio-tracking and simulated howling in two packs in Superior National Forest, Minnesota. Pups, yearlings, and adults returned intermittently to former homesites up to four months after abandonment, usually after prolonged separation from the pack in early fall. Returns sometimes exceeded one week. Preferred summer homesites were revisited most frequently. Visits declined as the season progressed either because attempts to relocate the pack were not facilitated, or simply because separations became rare. While temporarily at homesites, single wolves replied significantly more to simulated howling than when anywhere else, suggesting that homesites may provide reassurance for separated wolves.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Fall and winter homesite use by wolves in northeastern Minnesota
Series title:
Canadian Field-Naturalist
Volume
96
Issue:
1
Year Published:
1982
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
79-84
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Canadian Field-Naturalist
First page:
79
Last page:
84
Number of Pages:
6