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Wolf pack spacing: Howling as a territory-independent spacing mechanism in a territorial population

Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

By:
,
DOI: 10.1007/BF00343208

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Abstract

Howling is a principle means of spacing in wolf populations. The relationship between a pack's responses to howling (replies, movements) and its location within its home range, was studied using human-simulated howling in a territorial population in northeastern Minnesota. The results indicated the responses were independent of the pack's location, or the locations of the pack and playback relation to the territory center. These results indicate that howling serves as a territory-independent spacing mechanism, that will result in the use of exclusive territories when coupled with strong, year-round site attachment, but with floating, exclusive, buffer-areas about migratory packs.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Wolf pack spacing: Howling as a territory-independent spacing mechanism in a territorial population
Series title:
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
DOI:
10.1007/BF00343208
Volume
12
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1983
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
161-168
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
First page:
161
Last page:
168
Number of Pages:
8