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Wolf and bear predation on white-tailed deer fawns in northeastern Minnesota

Canadian Journal of Zoology

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Abstract

Whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn mortality was studied during the summers of 1989 and 1990 in northeastern Minnesota. Estimated pooled mortality rates for 21 radio-tagged fawns were 0.44 for the May-June, 0.13 for the July-October, and 0.51 for the May-October intervals. Predation accounted for all mortalities, with wolves (Canis lupus) responsible for 51% of them and black bears (Ursus americanus) for 49%. Fawns from mothers gt 4 years old weighed more and survived better than fawns from young mothers, which weighed less. Of various related factors (doe age, doe mass, fawn mass, fawn birth date, and fawn blood serum urea nitrogen (SUN)), only SUN was significant between surviving and perishing fawns, fawns with low SUN survived significantly less. Fawn SUN may have been only an indirect indicator of a doe physical, or behavioral factor that was more important to fawn survival.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Wolf and bear predation on white-tailed deer fawns in northeastern Minnesota
Series title:
Canadian Journal of Zoology
Volume
72
Issue:
9
Year Published:
1994
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
1557-1565
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Canadian Journal of Zoology
First page:
1557
Last page:
1565