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Growth and fatbody cycles in feral populations of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis (Pipidae), in California with comments on reproduction

Southwestern Naturalist

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Abstract

Feral populations of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) exist in several areas of southern California. By following the first cohort of progeny produced by African clawed frogs at a recently colonized site, data on the growth rates and age at first maturity were obtained in field conditions. Females reached maturity at an earlier age than males, grew faster than males, and attained body lengths up to 25% larger than males. Larger females were capable of producing larger numbers of eggs than small females and, therefore, had greater reproductive potential. The relatively stable ambient temperatures of southern California contributed to the possibility of reproduction of clawed frogs during all but the coolest periods of the year. Cycles detected in the mass of fatbodies suggested that nutrients were mobilized from fat prior to and during ovulation. The amount of fat in females varied widely, but fat in males tended to accumulate as the males grew during the study period.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Growth and fatbody cycles in feral populations of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis (Pipidae), in California with comments on reproduction
Series title:
Southwestern Naturalist
Volume
34
Issue:
4
Year Published:
1989
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
499-505
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Southwestern Naturalist
First page:
499
Last page:
505
Number of Pages:
7