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Breeding biology of Acadian flycatchers in a bottomland hardwood forest

Wilson Bulletin

By:
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Abstract

From 1993-1995, we located and monitored 601 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in a large contiguous tract of bottomland hardwood forest on the White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas. Annual reproductive success was significantly different among years; ranging from 10-25% (Mayfield estimate) over the three years of the study. There was no significant difference in nest success among study plots, with nesting success showing a trend of increasing late in the breeding season. Clutch size for non-parasitized nests averaged 2.9 ? 0.02 (SE) eggs with a mode of 3. Rates of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism were low (21%), accounting for 7% of all nest failures. However, parasitism by cowbirds resulted in a reduction of clutch size for nests initiated early (i.e., first nests and replacements) in the breeding season. Predation was the leading cause of nest failures, accounting for 75% of all failures. Snakes and avian predators were thought to be the leading cause of nest failures. Although additional factors must be investigated, preliminary results indicate that nest predation is a major influence on this population, despite the size of the forest tract.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Breeding biology of Acadian flycatchers in a bottomland hardwood forest
Series title:
Wilson Bulletin
Volume
110
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1998
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
226-232
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Wilson Bulletin
First page:
226
Last page:
232
Number of Pages:
7