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Reproduction in nondomestic birds: Physiology, semen collection, artificial insemination and cryopreservation

Avian and Poultry Biology Reviews

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Abstract

Pioneering work by Quinn and Burrows in the late 1930s led to successful artificial insemination (AI) programs in the domestic poultry industry. A variety of species specific modifications to the Quinn and Burrows massage technique made AI possible in nondomestic birds. Massage semen collection and insemination techniques span the entire range of species from sparrows to ostriches. Also, cooperative semen collection and electroejaculation have found limited use in some nondomestic species. Artificial insemination produces good fertility, often exceeding fertility levels in naturally copulating populations. However, aviculturists should explore other ways to improve fertility before resorting to AI. Artificial insemination is labor intensive and may pose risks to nondomestic birds as well as handlers associated with capture and insemination. Semen collection and AI makes semen cryopreservation and germ plasma preservation possible. Yet, semen cryopreservation techniques need improvement before fertility with frozen-thawed semen will equal fertility from AI with fresh semen.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Reproduction in nondomestic birds: Physiology, semen collection, artificial insemination and cryopreservation
Series title:
Avian and Poultry Biology Reviews
Volume
15
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2004
Language:
English
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
47-101
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Avian and Poultry Biology Reviews
First page:
47
Last page:
101
Number of Pages:
55