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Interacting parasites

Science

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Abstract

Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Interacting parasites
Series title:
Science
Volume
330
Issue:
6001
Year Published:
2010
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s):
Western Ecological Research Center
Description:
2 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Science
First page:
187
Last page:
188