thumbnail

Victims and vectors: highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 and the ecology of wild birds

Avian Biology Research

By:
, , , , , , , , , ,
DOI: 10.3184/175815510X12737339356701

Links

Abstract

The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses has raised concerns about the role of wild birds in the spread and persistence of the disease. In 2005, an outbreak of the highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 killed more than 6,000 wild waterbirds at Qinghai Lake, China. Outbreaks have continued to periodically occur in wild birds at Qinghai Lake and elsewhere in Central China and Mongolia. This region has few poultry but is a major migration and breeding area for waterbirds in the Central Asian Flyway, although relatively little is known about migratory movements of different species and connectivity of their wetland habitats. The scientific debate has focused on the role of waterbirds in the epidemiology, maintenance and spread of HPAI H5N1: to what extent are they victims affected by the disease, or vectors that have a role in disease transmission? In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of wild bird involvement in the ecology of HPAI H5N1. Specifically, we present details on: (1) origin of HPAI H5N1; (2) waterbirds as LPAI reservoirs and evolution into HPAI; (3) the role of waterbirds in virus spread and persistence; (4) key biogeographic regions of outbreak; and (5) applying an ecological research perspective to studying AIVs in wild waterbirds and their ecosystems.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Victims and vectors: highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 and the ecology of wild birds
Series title:
Avian Biology Research
DOI:
10.3184/175815510X12737339356701
Volume
3
Issue:
2
Year Published:
2010
Language:
English
Publisher:
Science Reviews 2000 Ltd
Publisher location:
London, U.K.
Contributing office(s):
Western Ecological Research Center
Description:
23 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
51
Last page:
73