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A case study of carbon fluxes from land change in the southwest Brazilian Amazon

Journal of Land Use Science

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Abstract

Worldwide, land change is responsible for one-fifth of anthropogenic carbon emissions. In Brazil, three-quarters of carbon emissions originate from land change. This study represents a municipal-scale study of carbon fluxes from vegetation in Rio Branco, Brazil. Land-cover maps of pasture, forest, and secondary growth from 1993, 1996, 1999, and 2003 were produced using an unsupervised classification method (overall accuracy = 89%). Carbon fluxes from land change over the decade of imagery were estimated from transitions between land-cover categories for each time interval. This article presents new methods for estimating emissions reductions from carbon stored in the vegetation that replaces forests (e.g., pasture) and sequestration by new (>10-15 years) forests, which reduced gross emissions by 16, 15, and 22% for the period of 1993-1996, 1996-1999, and 1999-2003, respectively. The methods used in the analysis are broadly applicable and provide a comprehensive characterization of regional-scale carbon fluxes from land change.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A case study of carbon fluxes from land change in the southwest Brazilian Amazon
Series title:
Journal of Land Use Science
Volume
4
Issue:
4
Year Published:
2009
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Publisher location:
Abingdon, UK
Contributing office(s):
Alaska Science Center Geography
Description:
16 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Land Use Science
First page:
233
Last page:
248
Country:
Brazil
Other Geospatial:
Amazon