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The impact of conservation on the status of the world's vertebrates

Science

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DOI: 10.1126/science.1194442

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Abstract

Using data for 25,780 species categorized on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List, we present an assessment of the status of the world's vertebrates. One-fifth of species are classified as Threatened, and we show that this figure is increasing: On average, 52 species of mammals, birds, and amphibians move one category closer to extinction each year. However, this overall pattern conceals the impact of conservation successes, and we show that the rate of deterioration would have been at least one-fifth again as much in the absence of these. Nonetheless, current conservation efforts remain insufficient to offset the main drivers of biodiversity loss in these groups: agricultural expansion, logging, overexploitation, and invasive alien species.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
The impact of conservation on the status of the world's vertebrates
Series title:
Science
DOI:
10.1126/science.1194442
Volume
330
Issue:
6010
Year Published:
2010
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
7 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Science
First page:
1503
Last page:
1509