Habits and Habitats of Fishes in the Upper Mississippi River

Based on the original booklet: Littlejohn, S., L. Holland, R. Jacobson, M. Huston, and T. Hornung. (1985) Habits and Habitats of Fishes in the Upper Missississippi River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, La Crosse, Wisconsin.
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The Upper Mississippi River consists of 26 navigation pools that provide abundant habitat for a host of natural resources, such as fish, migratory waterfowl, non-game birds, deer, beaver, muskrats, snakes, reptiles, frogs, toads, salamanders, and many others. Of all the many different types of animals that depend on the river, fish are the most diverse with over 140 different species. The sport fishery is very diverse with at least 25 species commonly harvested. Fish species, such as walleyes, largemouth bass, bluegills, and crappies are favorites of sport anglers. Others such as common carp, buffalos, and channel catfish, are harvested by commercial anglers and end up on the tables of families all over the country. Still other fishes are important because they provide food for sport or commercial species. The fishery resources in these waters contribute millions of dollars to the economy annually. Overall, the estimate impact of anglers and other recreational users exceeds $1.2 billion on the Upper Mississippi River. The fisheries in the various reaches of the river of often are adversely affected by pollution, urbanization, non-native fishes, navigation, recreational boating, fishing, dredging, and siltation. However, state and federal agencies expend considerable effort and resources to manage fisheries and restore river habitats. This pamphlet was prepared to help you better understand what fishery resources exist, what the requirements of each pecies are, and how man-induced changes that are roposed or might occur could affect them.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Publication Subtype:
Other Report
Habits and Habitats of Fishes in the Upper Mississippi River
Year Published:
Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee
Contributing office(s):
Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center
25 p.
United States