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Relationship of Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) to the ecology of small streams in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

General Technical Report NE-267

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Abstract

Hemlock ravines in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA) are highly valued because of their distinctive aesthetic, recreational and ecological qualities. We conducted a comparative study designed to determine the potential long-term consequences to aquatic communities of the suspected transition from hemlock-dominated forests to mixed hardwood forests as a result of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) induced mortality. A landscape analysis of DEWA using Geographic Information Systems (GIs) was used to select 14 hemlock and hardwood site-pairs that were similar in topography (i.e., slope, terrain shape, aspect, light levels) and stream size (first or second order) but differed in forest composition. This paired watershed approach provided a powerful means to discern the influence of hemlock forests on stream communities. This study was designed to provide an aquatic perspective on potential losses of biological diversity should hemlock forests die.

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Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Title:
Relationship of Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) to the ecology of small streams in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area
Series title:
General Technical Report
Series number:
NE-267
Year Published:
2000
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Forest Service
Publisher location:
Washington D.C.
Contributing office(s):
Leetown Science Center
Description:
1 p.
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Larger Work Title:
Proceedings: Symposium on sustainable management of hemlock ecosystems in Eastern North America
First page:
182
Last page:
182
Country:
United States
State:
New Jersey;Pennsylvania
Other Geospatial:
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area