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A Pliocene flora and insect fauna from the Bering Strait region

Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology

By:
, , , and
DOI: 10.1016/0031-0182(71)90032-0

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Abstract

A flood-plain forest has been preserved beneath a lava flow that invaded the Inmachuk River Valley in the northern part of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, during the Pliocene Epoch. The fossil flora is of great biogeographic interest because of its position (Fig. 1) in a tundra region about 250 km east of Bering Strait, 75 km south of the Arctic Circle, and 65 km west of the northwestern limit of spruce-birch forest. It provides insight into the history of the development of the circumpolar boreal forest (taiga). A rich arthropod fauna casts light on the phylogeny of several modern insect genera and on the origin of modern tundra faunas. A potassium-argon analysis of the overlying basaltic lava provides our first radiometric age estimate (5.7??0.2 million years) for the Clamgulchian Stage, a Late Tertiary time-stratigraphic unit based on fossil plants and widely recognized in Alaska (Wolfe and Hopkins 1967) and northeastern Siberia. ?? 1971.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A Pliocene flora and insect fauna from the Bering Strait region
Series title:
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
DOI:
10.1016/0031-0182(71)90032-0
Volume
9
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1971
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
First page:
211
Last page:
231