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Chemical composition of selected Kansas brines as an aid to interpreting change in water chemistry with depth

Chemical Geology

By:
and
DOI: 10.1016/0009-2541(69)90053-9

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Abstract

Chemical analyses of approximately 1,881 samples of water from selected Kansas brines define the variations of water chemistry with depth and aquifer age. The most concentrated brines are found in the Permian rocks which occupy the intermediate section of the geologic column of this area. Salinity decreases below the Permian until the Ordovician (Arbuckle) horizon is reached and then increases until the Precambrian basement rocks are reached. Chemically, the petroleum brines studied in this small area fit the generally accepted pattern of an increase in calcium, sodium and chloride content with increasing salinity. They do not fit the often-predicted trend of increases in the calcium to chloride ratio, calcium content and salinity with depth and geologic age. The calcium to chloride ratio tends to be asymptotic to about 0.2 with increasing chloride content. Sulfate tends to decrease with increasing calcium content. Bicarbonate content is relatively constant with depth. If many of the hypotheses concerning the chemistry of petroleum brines are valid, then the brines studied are anomolous. An alternative lies in accepting the thesis that exceptions to these hypotheses are rapidly becoming the rule and that indeed we still do not have a valid and general hypothesis to explain the origin and chemistry of petroleum brines. ?? 1969.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Chemical composition of selected Kansas brines as an aid to interpreting change in water chemistry with depth
Series title:
Chemical Geology
DOI:
10.1016/0009-2541(69)90053-9
Volume
4
Issue:
1-2
Year Published:
1969
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Chemical Geology
First page:
325
Last page:
339
Number of Pages:
15