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Gravity increase at the south pole

Science

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Abstract

Abstract. Measurements made between December 1957 and January 1966 of the gravity difference between the McMurdo Sound pendulum station, which is on bedrock, and the South Pole station, which is on the Antarctic ice sheet, show a gravity increase at the South Pole of 0.11 milligals per year. The most likely hypothesis for the increase is that it was caused by ice flowing downslope across a gravity gradient and by the sinking of the South Pole station as a result of accumulation of ice. An alternate hypothesis that the gravity increase was caused by a decrease in ice thickness, of about 40 centimeters per year, is theoretically possible but is not supported by direct evidence.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Gravity increase at the south pole
Series title:
Science
Volume
155
Issue:
3765
Year Published:
1967
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Science
First page:
1017
Last page:
1019
Number of Pages:
3