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Fission-track evidence for Quaternary uplift of the Nanga Parbat region, Pakistan

Nature

By:
, , ,
DOI: 10.1038/298255a0

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Abstract

The north-striking Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif protrudes into the northwestern Himalaya along the axis of a great syntaxis1,2 (Fig. 1), where the Hindu Kush, Karakorum, and Himalayan ranges converge. As the Indus Suture Zone3 enters this region from the east it bifurcates into two branches, encircling what may be a docked island-arc terrane4. The southern branch (the Main Mantle Thrust) crops out on both flanks of the Nanga Parbat massif, forming a tight structural loop5. This massif and the adjacent terrane contain some of the highest peaks in the Himalaya; Nanga Parbat and the Indus River (located just 20km away) define the world's greatest continental relief (6,930 m). We report here the discovery of unexpectedly young sphene, zircon and apatite fission-track dates from the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif. These dates (as low as 1.3 Myr for zircon and 0.4 Myr for apatite) imply that during the Pleistocene the Nanga Parbat region was uplifted and eroded at nearly 1 cm yr-1. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Fission-track evidence for Quaternary uplift of the Nanga Parbat region, Pakistan
Series title:
Nature
DOI:
10.1038/298255a0
Volume
298
Issue:
5871
Year Published:
1982
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Nature
First page:
255
Last page:
257
Number of Pages:
3