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Modern shallow-water graded sand layers from storm surges, Bering Shelf: a mimic of Bouma sequences and turbidite systems.

Journal of Sedimentary Petrology

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Abstract

A sequence of graded sand layers, interbedded with mud, extends offshore over 100km from the Yukon Delta shoreline across the flat, shallow epicontinental shelf of the northern Bering Sea, Alaska. Proximal graded sand beds on the delta-front platform near the shoreline are coarser, thicker and contain more complete vertical sequences of sedimentary structures than distal beds. The sequence of graded sands appears to be related to the major storm surges that occur every several years. The major storms increase the average 10-m water depth in southern Norton Sound as much as 5m and cause fluctuations in pore pressure from wave cyclic loading that may liquefy the upper 2 to 3m of sediment. -from Author

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Modern shallow-water graded sand layers from storm surges, Bering Shelf: a mimic of Bouma sequences and turbidite systems.
Series title:
Journal of Sedimentary Petrology
Volume
52
Issue:
2
Year Published:
1982
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Sedimentary Petrology
First page:
537
Last page:
545
Number of Pages:
9