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Tourmaline in Appalachian - Caledonian massive sulphide deposits and its exploration significance.

Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section B: Applied Earth Science

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Abstract

Tourmaline is a common gangue mineral in several types of stratabound mineral deposits, including some massive base-metal sulphide ores of the Appalachian - Caledonian orogen. It is most abundant (sometimes forming massive foliated tourmalinite) in sediment-hosted deposits, such as those at the Elizabeth Cu mine and the Ore Knob Cu mine (North Carolina, USA). Trace amounts of tourmaline occur associated with volcanic-hosted deposits in the Piedmont and New England and also in the Trondheim district. Tourmaline associated with the massive sulphide deposits are Mg- rich dravites with major- and trace-element compositions significantly different from schorl. It is suggested that the necessary B was produced by submarine exhalative processes as a part of the same hydrothermal system that deposited the ores. An abundance of dravite in non-evaporitic terrains is believed to indicate proximity to former subaqueous fumarolic centres.-R.A.H.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Tourmaline in Appalachian - Caledonian massive sulphide deposits and its exploration significance.
Series title:
Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section B: Applied Earth Science
Volume
91
Issue:
May
Year Published:
1982
Language:
English
Publisher:
Institution of Mining and Metallurgy
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Section B: Applied Earth Science
First page:
81
Last page:
89