thumbnail

FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.

Geological Society of America Bulletin

By:
,

Links

  • The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time

Abstract

Of the numerous kinds of dams that form by natural processes, dams formed from landslides, glacial ice, and late-neoglacial moraines present the greatest threat to people and property. Landslide dams form a wide range of physiographic settings. The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and debris avalanches; rock and soil slumps and slides; and mud, debris, and earth flows. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snowmelt and earthquakes. Natural dams may cause upstream flooding as the lake rises and downstream flooding as a result of failure of the dam. Although data are few, for the same potential energy at the dam site, downstream flood peaks from the failure of glacier-ice dams are smaller than those from landslide, moraine, and constructed earth-fill and rock-fill dam failures.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.
Series title:
Geological Society of America Bulletin
Volume
100
Issue:
7
Year Published:
1988
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
1054
Last page:
1068
Number of Pages:
15