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FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.

Geological Society of America Bulletin

By:
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Abstract

Of the numerous kinds of dams that form by natural processes, dams formed from landslides, glacial ice, and late-neoglacial moraines present the greatest threat to people and property. Landslide dams form a wide range of physiographic settings. The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and debris avalanches; rock and soil slumps and slides; and mud, debris, and earth flows. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snowmelt and earthquakes. Natural dams may cause upstream flooding as the lake rises and downstream flooding as a result of failure of the dam. Although data are few, for the same potential energy at the dam site, downstream flood peaks from the failure of glacier-ice dams are smaller than those from landslide, moraine, and constructed earth-fill and rock-fill dam failures.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.
Series title:
Geological Society of America Bulletin
Volume
100
Issue:
7
Year Published:
1988
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Geological Society of America Bulletin
First page:
1054
Last page:
1068
Number of Pages:
15