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Limestone and chert in tectonic blocks from the Esk Head subterrane, South Island, New Zealand

Geological Society of America Bulletin

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Abstract

The Esk Head subterrane is a continuous belt, generally 10-20 km wide, of tectonic melange and broken formation on the South Island of New Zealand. This subterrane separates older and younger parts of the Torlesse terrane which is an extensive accretionary prism composed mostly of quartzo-feldspathic, submarine-fan deposits ranging from Permian to Early Cretaceous in age. The Esk Head subterrane of the Torlesse is especially informative because it includes within it conspicuous tectonic blocks of submarine basalt and a variety of basalt-associated seamount and sea-floor limestones and cherty rocks thought to be representative of the subducted plate. Paleogeographic inferences drawn from megafossils, bioclasts, and radiolarians, as well as from carbonate cements, indicate deposition of the oceanic sedimentary rocks at paleolatitudes somewhat lower than that of the New Zealand part of the Gondwana margin, but higher than paleoequatorial latitudes. -Authors

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Limestone and chert in tectonic blocks from the Esk Head subterrane, South Island, New Zealand
Series title:
Geological Society of America Bulletin
Volume
100
Issue:
8
Year Published:
1988
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
1213
Last page:
1223
Number of Pages:
11