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The giant submarine alika debris slide, Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

Journal of Geophysical Research

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Abstract

A 4000-km2 area of submarine slump and slide deposits along the W flank of Mauna Loa volcano has been mapped with GLORIA side-scan sonar images, seismic reflection profiles, and new bathymetry. The youngest deposits are 2 debris avalanche lobes that travelled from their breakaway area near the present shoreline as much as 100 km into the Hawaiian Deep at water depths of 4800 m. The 2 lobes partly overlap and together are designated the Alika slide. They were derived from the same source area and probably formed in rapid succession. Slumping on Mauna Loa has been most intense adjacent to the large arcuate bend in its SW rift zone, as the rift zone migrated westward away from the growing Kilauea volcano. Slumping events were probably triggered by seismic activity accompanying dike injection along the rift zone. Such massive slumps, landslides and distal submarine turbidity flows appear to be widespread on the flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes.-from Authors

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
The giant submarine alika debris slide, Mauna Loa, Hawaii.
Series title:
Journal of Geophysical Research
Volume
93
Issue:
B5
Year Published:
1988
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Geophysical Research
First page:
4279
Last page:
4299
Number of Pages:
21