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Geochemical evolution of Kohala Volcano, Hawaii

Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology

By:
and
DOI: 10.1007/BF00518033

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Abstract

Kohala Volcano, the oldest of five shield volcanoes comprising the island of Hawaii, consists of a basalt shield dominated by tholeiitic basalt, Pololu Volcanics, overlain by alkalic lavas, Hawi Volcanics. In the upper Pololu Volcanics the lavas become more enriched in incompatible elements, and there is a transition from tholeiitic to alkalic basalt. In contrast, the Hawi volcanics consist of hawaiites, mugearites, and trachytes. 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 14 Pololu basalts and 5 Hawi lavas range from 0.70366 to 0.70392 and 0.70350 to 0.70355, respectively. This small but distinct difference in Sr isotopic composition of different lava types, especially the lower 87Sr/86Sr in the younger lavas with higher Rb/Sr, has been found at other Hawaiian volcanoes. Our data do not confirm previous data indicating Sr isotopic homogeneity among lavas from Kohala Volcano. Also some abundance trends, such as MgO-P2O5, are not consistent with a simple genetic relationship between Pololu and Hawi lavas. We conclude that all Kohala lavas were not produced by equilibrium partial melting of a compositionally homogeneous source. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Geochemical evolution of Kohala Volcano, Hawaii
Series title:
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
DOI:
10.1007/BF00518033
Volume
95
Issue:
1
Year Published:
1987
Language:
English
Publisher location:
Springer-Verlag
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
First page:
100
Last page:
113
Number of Pages:
14