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Chemistry and origin of minor and trace elements in vitrinite concentrates from a rank series from the eastern United States, England, and Australia

International Journal of Coal Geology

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Abstract

A rank series consisting of twelve vitrinite concentrates and companion whole-coal samples from mined coal beds in the eastern United States, England, and Australia were analyzed for C, H, N, O, ash, and 47 trace and minor elements by standard elemental, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), and direct-current-arc spectrographic (DCAS) techniques. The reflectance of vitrinite, atomic H:C and O:C, and ash-free carbon data were used to determine ranks that range from high-volatile C bituminous coal to meta-anthracite. A van Krevelen (atomic H:C vs. O:C) diagram of the vitrinite concentrates shows a smooth curve having its lowest point at H:C = 0.18 and O:C = 0.01. This improves the van Krevelen diagram by the addition of our vitrinite concentrate from meta-anthracite from the Narragansett basin of New England. Boron content (400-450 ppm) in two Illinois basin vitrinite concentrates was about an order of magnitude higher than B contents in other concentrates analyzed. We attribute this to marine origin or hydrothermal activity. The alkaline-earth elements Ca, Mg and Ba (DCAS) have higher concentrations in our vitrinite concentrates from bituminous coals of the Appalachian basin, than they do in vitrinite concentrates from the marine-roofed bituminous coals of the Illinois basin; therefore, a nonmarine origin for these alkaline-earth elements is postulated for the Appalachian basin coals. An ion-exchange mechanism due to high concentrations of these elements as ions in diagenetic water, but probably not recent ground water, may be responsible for the relatively high values of these elements in Appalachian concentrates. Higher concentrations of Ni and Cr in one of the English vitrinite concentrates and of Zr in the Australian concentrate probably indicate organic association and detrital influence, respectively. ?? 1989.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Chemistry and origin of minor and trace elements in vitrinite concentrates from a rank series from the eastern United States, England, and Australia
Series title:
International Journal of Coal Geology
Volume
13
Issue:
1-4
Year Published:
1989
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
481
Last page:
527
Number of Pages:
47