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Improved method for correlating late Pleistocene/Holocene records from the Bering Sea: application of a biosiliceous/geochemical stratigraphy

Deep Sea Research Part A, Oceanographic Research Papers

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Abstract

The combination of high-resolution siliceous biostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating provides a mechanism for detailed assessment of the depositional history in late Pleistocene sediments from the Bering Sea where average accumulation rates are uncharacteristically high compared to rates calculated for most other ocean basins. Vital to the development of this stratigraphy was the recognition that the abundance pattern of the radiolarian species Cycladophora davisiana in Bering Sea cores is quite similar to this species' previously correlated abundance curve in a late Pleistocene/Holocene record from the northwest Pacific. Comparison of this high-resolution stratigraphy with other recently developed floral and lithologic stratigraphies for late Pleistocene Bering Sea sediments shows that the various stratigraphies do not always yield identical results when applied to a particular sediment sequence. With this new stratigraphy based upon a combination of siliceous microfaunal abundance patterns and radiocarbon dating, one can identify reworking, discontinuities and other interruptions in the depositional sequence more precisely than with previously devised stratigraphies, thereby improving the correlation techniques for comparison of late Pleistocene/Holocene records from this marginal sea. ?? 1986.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Improved method for correlating late Pleistocene/Holocene records from the Bering Sea: application of a biosiliceous/geochemical stratigraphy
Series title:
Deep Sea Research Part A, Oceanographic Research Papers
Volume
33
Issue:
9
Year Published:
1986
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
1203
Last page:
1211
Number of Pages:
9