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Collection and analysis of colloidal particles transported in the Mississippi River, U.S.A.

Journal of Contaminant Hydrology

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DOI: 10.1016/0169-7722(90)90019-D

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Abstract

Sediment transport has long been recognized as an important mechanism for the transport of contaminants in surface waters. Suspended sediment has traditionally been divided into three size classes: sand-sized (>63 ??m), silt-sized (<63 ??m but settleable) and clay-sized (non-settleable). The first two classes are easily collected and characterized using screens (sand) and settling (silt). The clay-sized particles, more properly called colloids, are more difficult to collect and characterize, and until recently received little attention. From the hydrologic perspective, a colloid is a particle, droplet, or gas bubble with at least one dimension between 0.001 and 1 ??m. Because of their small size, colloids have large specific surface areas and high surface free energies which may facilitate sorption of hydrophobic materials. Understanding what types of colloids are present in a system, how contaminants of interest interact with these colloids, and what parameters control the transport of colloids in natural systems is critical if the relative importance of colloid-mediated transport is to be understood. This paper describes the collection, concentration and characterization of colloidal materials in the Mississippi River. Colloid concentrations, particle-size distributions, mineral composition and electrophoretic mobilities were determined. Techniques used are illustrated with samples collected at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.Sediment transport has long been recognized as an important mechanism for the transport of contaminants in surface waters. Suspended sediment has traditionally been divided into three size classes: sand-sized (> 63 ??m), silt-sized (< 63 ??m but settleable) and clay-sized (non-settleable). The first two classes are easily collected and characterized using screens (sand) and settling (silt). The clay-sized particles, more properly called colloids, are more difficult to collect and characterize, and until recently received little attention. From the hydrologic perspective, a colloid is a particle, droplet, or gas bubble with at least one dimension between 0.001 and 1 ??m. Because of their small size, colloids have large specific surface areas and high surface free energies which may facilitate sorption of hydrophobic materials. Understanding what types of colloids are present in a system, how contaminants of interest interact with these colloids, and what parameters control the transport of colloids in natural systems is critical if the relative importance of colloid-mediated transport is to be understood. This paper describes the collection, concentration and characterization of colloidal materials in the Mississippi River. Colloid concentrations, particle-size distributions, mineral composition and electrophoretic mobilities were determined. Techniques used are illustrated with samples collected at St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Collection and analysis of colloidal particles transported in the Mississippi River, U.S.A.
Series title:
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology
DOI:
10.1016/0169-7722(90)90019-D
Volume
6
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1990
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology
First page:
241
Last page:
250
Number of Pages:
10