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Late-glacial to holocene changes in winds, upwelling, and seasonal production of the northern California current system

Quaternary Research

By:
, , , ,
DOI: 10.1016/0033-5894(92)90044-J

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Abstract

A core 120 km off the coast of southern Oregon was examined for changes in lithology, diatoms, and pollen over the past 30,000 yr. Primary production during the late Pleistocene was about half that of the Holocene. Evidence from diatoms and pollen indicates that summer upwelling was much weaker, implying an absence of strong northerly winds. Early Pliocene diatoms found throughout the late Pleistocene section were probably derived from diatomites east of the Cascades and provide evidence for strong easterly winds over a dry continental interior. The findings verify predictions of a climate model based on glacial maximum conditions. There is no compelling evidence for a climatic reversal corresponding to the European Younger Dryas chron. During the early Holocene (9000-7000 yr B.P.) there may have been years when winds were insufficiently strong to support upwelling, so that warm stratified waters lay closer to the coast. ?? 1992.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Late-glacial to holocene changes in winds, upwelling, and seasonal production of the northern California current system
Series title:
Quaternary Research
DOI:
10.1016/0033-5894(92)90044-J
Volume
38
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1992
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Publisher location:
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
359
Last page:
370
Number of Pages:
12