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Impact origin of the Avak Structure, Arctic Alaska, and genesis of the Barrow gas fields

American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin

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Abstract

Geophysical and subsurface geologic data suggest that the Avak structure, which underlies the Arctic Coastal Plain 12 km southeast of Barrow, Alaska, is a hypervelocity meteorite or comet impact structure. The structure is a roughly circular area of uplifted, chaotically deformed Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks 8 km in diameter that is bounded by a ring of anastomosing, inwardly dipping, listric normal faults 12 km in diameter. Examination of cores from the Barrow gas fields and data concerning the age of the Avak structure suggest that the Avak meteorite struck a Late Cretaceous or Tertiary marine shelf or coastal plain between the Cenomanian (ca. 95 Ma), and deposition of the basal beds of the overlying late Pliocene and Quaternary Gubik Formation (ca. 3 Ma). -from Authors

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Impact origin of the Avak Structure, Arctic Alaska, and genesis of the Barrow gas fields
Series title:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin
Volume
76
Issue:
5
Year Published:
1992
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin
First page:
651
Last page:
679