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Taming a wild geothermal research well in yellowstone national park

By:
, , , and
Edited by:
Anon

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Abstract

In November 1992 the valve at the top of a U.S. Geological Survey drill hole in Yellowstone National Park parted from the casting as a result of corrosion. This allowed uncontrolled venting of boiling water and steam from the well at an estimated liquid flow rate of about 25-50 gallons per minute. A flow diverter assembly was designed, fabricated and installed on the well within 16 days, which allowed drill rods to be safely stripped into the well through on annular Blow-Out Preventer. Once this was accomplished it was a relatively routine matter to set a packer in the casting and cement the well shut permanently. The drill hole was brought under control and cemented shut within 18 days of the wellhead failure at a total cost of $47,066, which was about $5,000 less than anticipated.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Conference Paper
Publication Subtype:
Conference Paper
Title:
Taming a wild geothermal research well in yellowstone national park
ISBN:
0934412715
Volume
17
Year Published:
1993
Language:
English
Publisher:
Publ by Geothermal Resources Council
Publisher location:
Davis, CA, United States
Larger Work Title:
Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council
First page:
33
Last page:
36
Conference Title:
Proceedings of the 1993 Annual Meeting on Utilities and Geothermal: An Emerging Partnership
Conference Location:
Burlingame, CA, USA
Conference Date:
10 October 1993 through 13 October 1993