thumbnail

A late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene pluvial lake in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada and California

Geological Society of America Bulletin

By:
, , ,

Links

  • The Publications Warehouse does not have links to digital versions of this publication at this time

Abstract

The question of whether a pluvial lake existed in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada and California, has been debated for more than 100 yr. New stratigraphic evidence indicates that a lake did exist in this valley at intervals during late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene time. This lake may have drained northward, or it may have been periodically contiguous with a pluvial lake to the north in Columbus Salt Marsh. Proof of the existence of this lake, informally named Pluvial Lake Rennie, is derived from three principal outcrops of shallow-water deposits, two outcrops of deep-water deposits, and several drilling logs. The deposits contain beds of silicic tephra, which provide age control. Pluvial Lake Rennie fluctuated in size and depth beginning prior to 2 Ma and continuing until sometime after 0.77 Ma. At about 0.77 Ma, the lake had a highstand at an elevation of ~1460 m, covered an area of 400-500 km2, and had a maximum depth of ~250 m. The lake level dropped just after the eruption of the Bishop ash, but the lake may have persisted at a lower level until ~0.5 Ma. -from Authors

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene pluvial lake in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada and California
Series title:
Geological Society of America Bulletin
Volume
105
Issue:
7
Year Published:
1993
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
First page:
953
Last page:
967
Number of Pages:
15