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Debris flows in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: magnitude, frequency and effects on the Colorado River

By:
and
Edited by:
Shen Hsieh WenSu S.T.Wen Feng

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Abstract

Debris flows are recurrent sediment-transport processes in 525 tributaries of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Arizona. Initiated by slope failures in bedrock and (or) colluvium during intense rainfall, Grand Canyon debris flows are high-magnitude, short-duration floods. Debris flows in these tributaries transport very large boulders into the river where they accumulate on debris fans and form rapids. The frequency of debris flows range from less than 1 per century to 10 or more per century in these tributaries. Before regulation by Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, high-magnitude floods on the Colorado River reworked debris fans by eroding all particles except large boulders. Because flow regulation has substantially decreased the river's competence, debris flows occurring after 1963 have increased accumulation of finer-grained sediments on debris fans and in rapids.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Conference Paper
Publication Subtype:
Conference Paper
Title:
Debris flows in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona: magnitude, frequency and effects on the Colorado River
ISBN:
0872629201
Issue:
pt 2
Year Published:
1993
Language:
English
Publisher:
Publ by ASCE
Publisher location:
New York, NY, United States
Larger Work Title:
Proceedings - National Conference on Hydraulic Engineering
First page:
1290
Last page:
1295
Conference Title:
Proceedings of the National Conference on Hydraulic Engineering
Conference Location:
San Francisco, CA, USA
Conference Date:
25 July 1993 through 30 July 1993