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Regression equations for disinfection by-products for the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri rivers

Science of the Total Environment

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DOI: 10.1016/S0048-9697(96)05266-7

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Abstract

Trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials were determined for the chlorination of water samples from the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers. Samples were collected during the summer and fall of 1991 and the spring of 1992 at twelve locations on the Mississippi from New Orleans to Minneapolis, and on the Ohio and Missouri 1.6 km upstream from their confluences with the Mississippi. Formation potentials were determined as a function of pH, initial free-chlorine concentration, and reaction time. Multiple linear regression analysis of the data indicated that pH, reaction time, and the dissolved organic carbon concentration and/or the ultraviolet absorbance of the water were the most significant variables. The initial free-chlorine concentration had less significance and bromide concentration had little or no significance. Analysis of combinations of the dissolved organic carbon concentration and the ultraviolet absorbance indicated that use of the ultraviolet absorbance alone provided the best prediction of the experimental data. Regression coefficients for the variables were generally comparable to coefficients previously presented in the literature for waters from other parts of the United States.

Additional Publication Details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Regression equations for disinfection by-products for the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri rivers
Series title:
Science of the Total Environment
DOI:
10.1016/S0048-9697(96)05266-7
Volume
191
Issue:
3
Year Published:
1996
Language:
English
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Science of the Total Environment
First page:
235
Last page:
244